Erasmus “Welcome Weeks” and the consumption of the city

CIMG0685Since the last week of August Lisbon has received a large amount of foreign students, most of them (approximately 3.500 for both semesters) belonging to the Erasmus Programme. During this time some organizations presumably devoted to help and guide the young foreign students in their first days in the city, organized several activities to get to know the particularities of Lisbon to them while creating that friendly atmosphere of socialization attributed to Erasmus students: Walking Tours, Barbecues, Surf Days, Drinking Contests, Trips to Sintra, Language Tandems and Parties. Lots of Parties. In fact, almost the totality of the activities are nightlife and alcohol-oriented. And happen always in the very same places.

If we put those Erasmus “Welcome Weeks” over a map they seem to be almost coincident with the nightscapes of tourist and local middle-class (and upper) groups of youngsters: starting the night very early in the Bairro Alto (filling bars otherwise empty) and then going to the pubs and discos sited on Santos and Cais do Sodré, party areas near the river Tejo. Thus, what’s the impact of those nightlife activities over the urban landscape, the changing local venues, and the transformation of the city? Clearly the Erasmus environment -initially guided by several organizations of students- contribute, together with other similar groups of young middle-class (and upper) individuals, to the nightlife specialization of some urban areas and their progressive elitization.

Certainly the importance of those highly-mobile, well-educated young individuals called “Erasmus” in the transformation of the city is well represented by their mainstream international-style patterns of consumption. However, several “alternative” students reject those lifestyles avoiding Erasmus and tourist environments and seeking for a real contact with the “local elements”. During my fieldwork in the last two weeks I talked to several students attending the “Welcome Weeks” that seems to be building up that kind of distinguished forms of identification: they are complaining about the “nonsense conversations” and the “stupid behaviors” of other students, and escaping from the “tourist prices and places”. Are they just less-income students or something more?

CIMG0501

 

In the following months we will see how they behave and where will they go in some creative strategies of distinction: Are they harmless for the urbanization processes or maybe are they contributing to the transformation of the city as well?

 

For a previous study about “alternative” Erasmus and their “impact” to the city, see my article: Patrimonial revaluation processes in Alfama neighbourhood (Lisbon): the role of Erasmus students in city thematization (in Spanish)


This entry was posted in Fieldwork, Posts, Work-in-progress and tagged , , , , by Daniel Malet Calvo. Bookmark the permalink.

About Daniel Malet Calvo

I have a PhD in Urban Anthropology (2011) from University of Barcelona where I also have graduated with a BA in Social and Cultural Anthropology (2005), and a BA in History (2011). My thesis work puts forward a historical and ethnographic research focused on the most emblematic space in Lisbon's downtown: Praça do Rossio. I have been trained through many investigation projects, research grants and ethnographic works on Lisbon and Barcelona during my thesis, mainly focused on anthropology of urban space, city policies, collective action and olisipography. I'm also did research on Santiago island (Cape Verde archipelago), where I acquired experience on mobility conceptions, risk practices and urban renewal projects. Currently, as a post-doctoral researcher in the CIES-IUL (Centro de Investigação e Estudos de Sociologia – Instituto Universitário de Lisboa) I'm investigating ERASMUS students as a short-term migration actors involved on heritagization processes, space production and transnational dynamics. Besides this, I'm an active member of the Grup de Recerca sobre Exclusió i Control Socials (GRECS) in the Anthropology Department of the Universitat de Barcelona, and of the Institut Català d'Antropologia (ICA)

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.